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Cervical Screening NSW
The NSW Pap Test Register Infoline: call 13 15 56.

Information about cervical screening for Aboriginal women

Regular Pap tests can prevent up to 90% of the most common cervical cancers – and in Australia, that means saving the lives of more than 1,200 women each year. A Pap test picks up early warning signs that can be treated before cancer develops.

Aboriginal women are more than five times more likely to die from cervical cancer than non-Aboriginal women in Australia. This suggests that Aboriginal women are less likely to have regular Pap tests to pick up early warning signs.

Cervical cancer is one of the most preventable of all cancers. Cervical cancer is a disease where normal cells in the cervix change and multiply to form a growth or tumor.

If you have a Pap test every two years you are doing the most important thing possible to avoid this disease.

What is a Pap test?

Do I need a Pap test?

Where do I go for a Pap test?

What does a Pap test involve?

What if I forget to have my next Pap test?

Aboriginal women

What is a Pap test?

A Pap test is a quick and simple test that checks for changes to the cells of your cervix (entrance to the womb) that may lead to cervical cancer.

The Pap test is the best way of avoiding cervical cancer, which is commonly caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). The evidence for HPV causing cervical cancer is very strong.

Most women who develop cervical cancer have not had regular Pap tests.  The most common type of cervical cancer takes up to 10 years to develop. It is important to have a test every two years, so that any abnormal cells are detected early.

Do I need a Pap test?

If you’re aged between 18 and 70 years and have ever been sexually active, you should have a Pap test every two years – even if you’ve had the cervical cancer vaccine and even if you no longer have sex.

If you are near 70 years of age and have never had Pap test, it is still recommended that you have one.

Pap tests are for ‘well women’. If you have any signs such as irregular bleeding or pain, see your doctor or nurse straight away.

Where do I go for a Pap test?

You can have a Pap test in just a few minutes, at an Aboriginal Medical Service, your local doctor’s consulting rooms, or a women’s health, or Family Planning clinic. 

It is ok to choose a provider who is not your regular doctor if it makes having the test more comfortable. When you’ve chosen the location and health provider that will make you feel the most comfortable, call and make an appointment.  If you’re feeling anxious, you can organise to take a family member or friend with you.

What does a Pap test involve?

When you arrive for your Pap test, the nurse or doctor will take you to a private room. You will be asked to take off your clothing from your waist down and lie down. Your provider will usually give you a bed sheet which you can place over you.

The nurse or doctor ask you to bend your knees and will insert a speculum into your vagina. The speculum will assist your provider to collect a sample of cells from your cervix using a small swab, in a process that takes a few seconds.

The test does not take long and is completely safe. It may be uncomfortable but it should not hurt.

The cells are placed on a slide and sent to a laboratory where they are tested. The doctor or nurse who performs your test will explain how to find out your results.

A small number of Pap tests show changes which may need more tests. If you do require more tests, don’t worry, most changes are not cancer

What if I forget to have my next Pap test?

After your first Pap test, your name will be recorded on the Pap Test Register. This is a confidential reminder system that will send you a letter when you are overdue for your next Pap test.

Make an appointment with your doctor or nurse today. A regular Pap test helps you avoid cervical cancer and protect your health.

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